Sunday, March 16, 2014

Block #15 Baltimore Garden

I hope to spend a few hours today working on Block #15 of Baltimore Garden. I have some embroidery to add to this block. A branch in a couple of bird’s mouths, some bird legs, some bird eyes and  some details stitching in the tail.  I love adding these kinds of details as they add so much to a block.
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I did notice this morning after I finished adding the stems that my block has a bit of bulge in the center. Sometimes, I find this happens when I add add bias stems as I have a tendency to stretch them a bit when stitching them down.  I find that a good blocking of the block works all of this out.  I start with a very light spray of starch to the back side of the block. I lay it out on a soft terry towel, and start pressing with an up and down motion smoothing any wrinkles with my hands as I move around the block.  This is the block after the blocking.IMG_0445[1]
As you can see that solved any stretching or distortion that happened while I was stitching.  Now, I just need to get the little swag detail templates made so I can applique them into place and then I can move on to adding the embroidery.  I will be linking to Kathy’s blog to see what others are slow stitching today.  Seeing all the hand work being done is so inspirational and there is always something new to learn.

29 comments:

  1. this happens to mine sometimes too! the hazards of applique I guess - lovely block

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    1. I think it might happen for most, almost impossible to stitch down bias stems and keep things flat. I have tried glue and it helps some, but I don't like using glue in my quilts.

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  2. Thanks for that tip! I haven't done enough applique (yet!) to experience that, but now I'll know what to do about it. Enjoy your hand stitching - thanks for linking up!

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    1. Thanks Deb! Blocking makes all the difference and the terry towel (sometimes I use two) really help so that the whole backing gets pressed and the applique doesn't get squished.

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  4. Your applique block is lovely. You know what you are doing to fix the block. I've seen other appliquers add embroidery and it does add interest.

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    1. Thanks Jill, Yes there are some that do exquisite work, I dabble in adding a bit of embroidery here and there and just have fun with it.

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  5. Thank you for sharing that tip. I would probably be ripping itall out. Now I know better. But, I am so good at ripping out stitches. LOL

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    1. I do better with hand work, now give me some piecing to do, and you better sharpen all the seam rippers. Lately I have done some paper piecing and I still have to rip out!

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  6. Gorgeous block and thanks for the tips on the bulging fabrics.

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  7. Gorgeous! Some day I hope to be to appliqué half as well as you! And if/when that day comes, I'll remember that blocking tip. Thanks!

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    1. Thanks Kathy, Applique is all about starting with good cotton fabric, some good thin thread, and practicing. Then all you have to do is remember it is one stitch at a time as you turn your fabric with your needle.

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  8. Fabulous work on your block, great tip too, lol, I have a bulging quilt..I plan on spraying with water and flattens on two tables to correct..just gotta get motivated to do it. (Had used it to wrap around my shoulders at guild last summer when air conditioning was set too high..stretched things out wonky!)

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    1. I know some block their quilts by spraying with water and pinning it to carpet and letting it air dry. You have to be careful with how wet you get it, since sometimes water can cause dyes in the fabric to bleed. I find to dampen something well spray lightly with water and then ball it up and stick in the freezer. The freezer tries to pull the moisture out and when it does it gets evenly damp.

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  9. I love these process posts that help solve problems. Thanks!

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    1. I agree, they are wonderful! There really is a need for a lot of knowledge to make a quilt. No wonder when we first start out it seems like such a big undertaking.

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  10. It's going to be another beautiful block!!

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    1. Thanks Raewyn, I am so glad to be back to work on this quilt! The slow stitching is so enjoyable!

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  11. Great tip Carla! I may need that once I get the nerve up to try that 12 inch appliqué block waiting in the drawer for the Century quilt.

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  12. Wonderful tip! Very good to know how to deal with slight distortion that happens with applique. Love your work!

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    1. Thanks Audry, I see so many quilter's give up on projects for things that really will work themselves out.

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  13. Carla, you do excellent applique.

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    1. Thanks Karen It is such a wonderful process. So addictive!

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  14. Gorgeous! And it's nice to know I'm not the only one that has problems from time to time. I'll know how to tackle this one if I ever decide I'd like to do such gorgeous applique projects.

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    1. Thanks for your kind words Cathy! I find applique easier than piecing. Although I have enjoyed a bit of paper piecing lately, something I didn't think I would ever enjoy.

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